Spilling Tea at The Adolphus Hotel

Spilling Tea at The Adolphus Hotel

Last week, my friend, Ilse, and I went to high tea at The Adolphus Hotel. If you have been following my blog since study abroad, you will know that I have been to high tea before. High tea is a pricey activity and I’m really not a tea girl, but who doesn’t like to have a bougie outing now and again? This has been a tradition here in Dallas for decades apparently. I couldn’t find an exact date of when it started, but I learned on arrival that The Adolphus Hotel has been here since 1912, so I will take a guess it’s been at least 20 years of high tea during the holidays.

Continue reading “Spilling Tea at The Adolphus Hotel”

Eat, Pray, Love…10 Years Later?

Eat, Pray, Love…10 Years Later?

Disclaimer: This is a review of Eat, Pray, Love the film, not the book.

I genuinely can’t remember when I first saw Eat, Pray, Love. The book came out in 2007 when I was a 7th grader and then the movie came out in 2010 when I was in 10th grade–both years of my life during which I did not have the penchant for traveling that I later developed. Further, this book/movie followed a 34-year-old woman regarding topics I had no deep connection to: broken relationships, sense of belonging, life’s purpose–you know, the things you contemplate as an adult. As both a 12-year-old and a 15-year-old, my only concern was the VMAs, going to the mall, and when Beyoncé’s next album was going to drop.
What I do know is when I did eventually watch this, I fell in love (pun intended). I am pretty sure it was after my senior trip to Rome in 2012 because that’s her first destination. I routinely watch this film whenever I am feeling in a mindset of restlessness and when I just need to see The Pasta Scene (more on that later), but when I thought to write a review on it, I discovered this film premiered 10 years ago as of August. So, how does it hold up in 2020?

Continue reading “Eat, Pray, Love…10 Years Later?”

Sightseeing in San Antonio (Updated 2020)

Sightseeing in San Antonio (Updated 2020)

Four years ago, two members of my intern class, Karen and Victoria, and I visited San Antonio for a day of sightseeing and I wrote about it. If you read my blog post about road trips, you know that I am pretty familiar with visiting San Antonio. This past week, I went down with my boyfriend for a pit stop to Laredo to renew his SENTRI status–the purpose of the road trip–and while we spent two nights in San Antonio, we didn’t really find anything new to point out about the city. When I visited with Karen and Victoria, we did all the touristy things that really define the city, thus, I figured I would edit this existing post with some 2020 updates for anyone who has never visited. 🙂
Continue reading “Sightseeing in San Antonio (Updated 2020)”

Feeling SAD

Disclaimer: I am not a psychiatrist. You should always seek professional help before self-/misdiagnosing.

Today is Daylight Saving (excluding Hawaii and most of Arizona) which is usually the first sign of reality that we are entering the dark and cold months of the year. Though many states have already been experiencing winter-like weather, the addition of early sunsets makes the transition that much more ‘real.’ Even here in Texas, we have spent this past week mostly in the 40s with rain. I have to say, personally, this is my favorite time of the year and I look forward to that extra hour of sleep this day allots. However, I know that many people dread this time of year and even experience seasonal affective disorder, or SAD–aptly named.

According to Psychology Today, “Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a type of recurrent major depressive disorder in which episodes of depression occur during the same season each year. This condition is sometimes called the “winter blues,” because the most common seasonal pattern is for depressive episodes to appear in the fall or winter and remit in the spring.” On the surface, it appears SAD can affect most people as we receive less daylight in the fall and winter and we all know Vitamin D plays a major role with our energy levels. Even during daylight hours, there are a lot more days of gray skies and unpleasant weather. Despite SAD affecting 10 million Americans, more commonly in women, “to be diagnosed with SAD, an individual must meet criteria for major depression coinciding with specific seasons for at least two years.” Still, many people can have the symptoms or have a mild version of SAD.

Continue reading “Feeling SAD”